Cutting Our (Financial) Losses in the Public Realm: Running Schools Like a Business

Well, it’s beginning.

Well, actually, it had already begun.

So it continues.

And the pace of it just might be picking up.

School closings that is.

Detroit Public Schools Community District has just announced that it will be closing Durfee Middle School.

If you follow Michigan’s education scene, you know that the State School Reform Office (tellingly located under the Michigan Department of Technology/Management and Budget department rather than the Department of Education- it’s complicated) is looking to close schools that perform in the lowest 5% across the state for 3 consecutive years. (You also know that over 100 public schools have closed in Detroit since 2005.) The Detroit Free Press explains,“More than 120 schools were on the state’s 2015 list of Michigan’s bottom 5% of schools, including 47 schools in the Detroit district. Durfee has been on the list since 2014.

The 2016 bottom 5% list — and an announcement about school closures or reforms — is expected to be publicly released within weeks. The Michigan Department of Education compiles the bottom 5% list based on state test data. Officials warned in August that some schools that have been on the list for three consecutive years could be shut down.”

I’ve previously addressed this cruel nonsense of determining the success or failure of a school by using “achievement data.” (See herehere and here.) However, in order to establish some context it is worth repeating Paul Gorksi’s incisive criticism of “deficit ideology” as the means through we view “school failure.” Gorski writes, “The function of deficit ideology…is to justify existing social conditions by identifying the problem of inequality as located within, rather than as pressing upon, disenfranchised communities so that efforts to redress inequalities focus on ‘fixing’ disenfranchised people rather than the conditions which disenfranchise them.”

In short, closing schools hides and replicates conditions of inequity.

I wish our State School Reform Office understood that.

Now, to be fair, John Walsh, Director of Public Strategy, points out that the state is not requiring Durfee to close. Instead, it is the newly named (it’s complicated ) Detroit Public Schools Community District  that has made this decision. Walsh states, “We are working with (the district) on the Durfee matter…It was their decision. We believe it was a good one. They came to it on their own.” (emphasis added)

But, to be fair, the district certainly did not come to this decision on their own.

As a school that has been on the lowest 5% list since 2014, Durfee has been in the sights of the State School Reform Office. The former Detroit Public School’s former so-called “Transition Manager” (not Emergency Manager- it’s complicated) made this clear. Steven Rhodes said he was, “…grateful for the administration’s agreement that our planned closing of Durfee Elementary-Middle School in June 2017 to consolidate it with Central High School for the fall of 2017 will resolve our (School Reform Office) issues for this school year. …

We are pleased that this resolution will obviate the need for litigation, which would have been distracting, expensive and of uncertain result for everyone.”

So DPSCD made this decision in order to “resolve” the SSRO “issues.” And, of course, now there is not need for litigation. (“Obviate,” as used by Rhodes, means to “render unneccessary.” See how he did that?)

So much for that “they made the decision on their own” thing.

And in this day and age when schools are expected to be run like a business, DPSCD seems to have made a wonderful business decision. First of all, they save on the cost of future litigation. And now, you see, the former space used by Durfee Middle Schools students and staff, space that was run at a huge net loss of potential profit due to lack of income, maintenance costs, and the cost of labor, is not being leased out to the tune of $1 a year! That’s a tremendous net difference between past loss and current savings, and will most certainly decrease the cost of running an actual, publicly funded educational facility. A bonus? “Entrepreneurs will be able to guest lecture in the classrooms.”

Right in line with the task of schools.

Yes?

education-is-a-process1Let me be clear. Detroit schools are under the gun.It’s not their fault- they are trying to survive.

At fault are the policies of cruelty of the state of Michigan, beginning with the fundamental assumption that “achievement data” can serve as a means of economic exchange. Educational “value” can be determined via test scores, and thus commodified in the “educational marketplace.”

In addressing this market, Diane Ravtich once wrote, (quoting a Fareed Zakaria interview)

“‘…in a global economy, capital always seeks to lower costs. In a competitive marketplace, if you can’t cut costs, you go out of business. The name of the game is who can cut costs the most.’

What does this mean in an education marketplace? The school that can lower its costs the most wins. How do you lower costs? You increase class size and/or hire the least experienced, low-cost teachers.”

Even better?

Close the school.

This is the logical end of the neoliberal commodification of everything.

Kids and community be damned.

Image from Student Coalition for Educational Justice

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2 responses to “Cutting Our (Financial) Losses in the Public Realm: Running Schools Like a Business

  1. This is what’s interesting or horrifying depending on how you look at it. The neo-liberal greed-is-great agenda, no matter how many suffer from it, is build on one man’s economic theory, Milton Friedman, and those who kneel and worship as this man’s _______ (fill in the blank, any word you want), is because he was awarded a Noble Prize in Economic Sciences in a field that is not a recognized science, one that Alfred Nobel would have rejected as a science.

    In addition, between 1969 and 2916, Milton Friedman is only one of 78 who have been awarded the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in memory of a man who would have rejected it as a science if he were alive today.

    The reason this Noble Prize even exists is because of a bank and politics wanting this award even if the founder of the award would have rejected it because Economics is not a science. How many times should I say that?

    Why aren’t any of the other 77 worshiped by the wealthy and corporations as much as Friedman is? It doesn’t take much of a stretch to think of an answer. Someone or more than one wanted to justify greed.

    Economics is not a science, and I’m not alone in saying that.

    “No, Economics Is Not a Science” – Harvard

    http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/12/13/economics-science-wang/

    Don’t let the Nobel prize fool you. Economics is not a science

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/oct/11/nobel-prize-economics-not-science-hubris-disaster

    10 reasons why economics is an art, not a science

    “Why did God invent economists?” You’ll have to click the last link to discover the answer.

    Well, first, God didn’t invent them. Some greedy asshat with too much wealth did that and then probably told the first economist what he was going to say so the asshat had (false) justification for destroying other people, through ecnomic crashes and war, and even manipulate history and countries to increase the asshat’s power and wealth.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/10-reasons-why-economics-is-an-art-not-a-science/2013/08/08/7c501020-ffb5-11e2-9711-3708310f6f4d_story.html?utm_term=.fa4ab093be46

    Littlefingers Donald Trump’s business history is a perfect example of the con-man’s art of economic theory; crystal ball, tarot card guess work.

    How do we stop this greed-is-good insanity without the gutters running red with blood?

  2. Reblogged this on Mister Journalism: "Reading, Sharing, Discussing, Learning" and commented:

    Cutting Our (Financial) Losses in the Public Realm: Running Schools Like a Business
    by wboyler
    Well, it’s beginning.

    Well, actually, it had already begun.

    So it continues.

    And the pace of it just might be picking up.

    School closings that is.

    Detroit Public Schools Community District has just announced that it will be closing Durfee Middle School.

    If you follow Michigan’s education scene, you know that the State School Reform Office (tellingly located under the Michigan Department of Technology/Management and Budget department rather than the Department of Education- it’s complicated) is looking to close schools that perform in the lowest 5% across the state for 3 consecutive years. (You also know that over 100 public schools have closed in Detroit since 2005.) The Detroit Free Press explains,”More than 120 schools were on the state’s 2015 list of Michigan’s bottom 5% of schools, including 47 schools in the Detroit district. Durfee has been on the list since 2014.

    The 2016 bottom 5% list — and an announcement about school closures or reforms — is expected to be publicly released within weeks. The Michigan Department of Education compiles the bottom 5% list based on state test data. Officials warned in August that some schools that have been on the list for three consecutive years could be shut down.”

    I’ve previously addressed this cruel nonsense of determining the success or failure of a school by using “achievement data.” (See here, here and here.) However, in order to establish some context it is worth repeating Paul Gorksi’s incisive criticism of “deficit ideology” as the means through we view “school failure.” Gorski writes, “The function of deficit ideology…is to justify existing social conditions by identifying the problem of inequality as located within, rather than as pressing upon, disenfranchised communities so that efforts to redress inequalities focus on ‘fixing’ disenfranchised people rather than the conditions which disenfranchise them.”

    In short, closing schools hides and replicates conditions of inequity.

    I wish our State School Reform Office understood that.
    (Read the full post here: https://educarenow.wordpress.com/2017/01/06/4450/)

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